Employee Motivation Tips — Clark Wells — Employee Motivation Advisor: Three R’s of Employee Motivation and Employee Engagement

When was the last time you heard your supervisor say something like you need to treat our customers like they were guests in your home? When I worked in retail, I used to listen to that quite often. What struck me as odd was that my supervisor did not treat me the same way as I was expected to address the customers. I found this very frustrating. Have you ever experienced that situation? What did you learn from it? When was the last time you heard your supervisor say something like you need to treat our customers like they were guests in your home? When I worked in retail, I used to hear that quite often. What struck me as odd was that my supervisor did not treat me the same way as I was expected to treat the customers.

I found this very frustrating. Have you ever experienced that situation? What did you learn from it? I think many supervisors unknowingly create conflict and frustration within the office store or restaurant and don’t even realize that they’re doing anything wrong. After all, they are doing what they learned from their boss. They have good intentions. They understand that it is important to take care of the customer, but an important piece of this function of leadership is their failure to understand that they also have to take care of the employees.

Some of the employers and supervisors I have talked with feel that it is the employee’s responsibility to be self-motivated, and some employees are. If you subscribe to the school of thought that all employees need to be self-motivated, you don’t need to read any further because this article is not for you. For those of you who continue to read on. You understand that not all employees are self-motivated and that you have an active part to play in their motivation at work. As a leader engaging and motivating your employees is your responsibility. For most employees, engagement and motivation do not happen by chance.

It is a well planned and orchestrated employer-employee process that changes in employee from merely being present at work to be an engaging and motivated employee at work. At this point, you may be asking yourself what do I have to do to engage and motivate my employees? This is where I dispel the myth that there is a single processor action that will engage and motivate employees. It is a combination of processes and actions that employers take to change the corporate culture from one of being singularly customer focused to one of employee and customer focus. Let’s state the obvious you need the customer to make a profit, and you need employees to interact with the customers in such a way that the customer will help you make a profit. It is a triangle from you to the employee to the customer and back to you. If any part of the triangle is broke well you know the results.

I firmly believe that when you take care of the employees, and they know the focus of the business. They will take care of your customers. How can you take care of your employees? Follow the three Rs to improved employee motivation and engagement. Recognize reward and renew are the three Rs to employee motivation and employee engagement. Recognition is first because this is where you have the opportunity to demonstrate to your existing employees that they are doing a good job and that you care. As a leader, you should be making every effort to recognize the accomplishments of your employee as soon after the accomplishment occurs.

Waiting days weeks and months to recognize the employee lessons the effects of your words. Your words need to be very specific. For example, Clark was a great article that you wrote on employee motivation. Thanking an employee for doing that thing they do to help the organization do that thing it does is a wasted effort because it is not specific. Rewarding your employees comes second. You may be saying that in these economic times we are experiencing you cannot afford to reward your employees.

Keep in mind that the rewards do not have to be cash, but whatever the reward is, it must be of value to the employee. In other words, you don’t have to give the employee cash, but it does have to be valued. At the very least, the reward should be a thank you in front of their peers. It could also be a personal note of thanks. There are many alternatives to giving cash to include a reserved parking spot for a week or a month near the office.

Renewal goes back to the fundamental reasons of why this person was hired. The hiring authority saw something that this person had to offer that was going to be a benefit to the organization. The chances are that when the person was hired, they felt a sense of relief about having a job and the person that hired them was relieved because of what this person had to offer. It is that feeling of relief a problem solved by this hiring action that you need to go back to; that feeling of gratitude to help each employee feel welcome and appreciated. As I stated before you don’t have to throw money at your employees, but you do need to make them feel like they are valued and appreciated. Anything less and you are loudly proclaiming that you don’t need them and they will leave you either physically or in spirit.

When they leave in the spirit, they are present at work but unmotivated and unengaged. Treat your employees like you treat your customers. Demonstrate to your employees they are valued and respected, and they will help you take care of your customers like they were guests in their own home.

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